/Tag: best practices

The human element to strategy

By |2016-07-15T23:03:43+00:00July 15th, 2016|Enterprise Architecture|

There is no shortage of business thinkers and authors who will tell us this statement is true:

Anyone can create a good strategy.  The most frequent failure is in execution.

Unfortunately, this underestimates the difficulty in creating a “good strategy.”  While the statement above is absolutely true, it is not unusual to find companies that don’t have a formal strategy at all, or who fail to share their divisional strategies with all of their employees (a key measurement of strategy adoption in a company is “how many of your employees can recite your company strategy”).

One of the obstacles I’ve come to recognize in Enterprise Architecture is unique to companies that either don’t have a formal strategy or who do not share their strategy with their staff — you cannot align efforts to strategy if there is no consistent understanding of strategy across divisions.

I always knew this was true.  I’ve become more and more convinced that it is a hard-and-fast rule.  In other words, if you want to be successful as an EA in a company that doesn’t share strategy, this becomes your First Order Problem — how to develop a consistent strategy that everyone at the senior level agrees with and that they are willing to share with their staff.

That’s it in a nutshell.  To be successful, your organization must develop a consistent strategy that everyone at the senior level agrees with and that they are willing to share with their staff.

First order problem — In other words, focus on this.  Make progress on this.  Measure yourself by your progress on this.  Associate yourself with the people who “should” own this, and align yourself with the people who actually do own this (rarely the same person). Find ways to be involved.  Find ways to contribute. Volunteer.  Make things happen.  Find ways to support incremental progress, while recognizing that the increment may not be good enough in the long run.  For EA to become known for “doing successful Enterprise Architecture,” a clear and communicated company strategy is ground zero.

 

Ten Ways to Kill An Enterprise Architecture Practice

By |2013-09-05T18:30:19+00:00September 5th, 2013|Enterprise Architecture|

Have you seen practices that you know could kill an Enterprise Architecture practice?  I have.  A recent LinkedIn thread asked for examples, and I came up with my top ten.  I’d love to hear your additions to the list.

How to screw up an EA practice

  1. Get a senior leader to ask for EA without any idea of what he is going to get for it. If necessary, lie. Tell leaders that EA will improve their agility or reduce complexity without telling them that THEY and THEIR BUSINESS will have to change.
  2. Set no goals. Allow individual architects to find their own architecture opportunities and to do them any way they want.   Encourage cowboy architecture.
  3. Buy a tool first. Tell everyone that they need to wait for results until the tool is implemented and all the integration is complete.
  4. Get everyone trained on a "shell framework" like Zachman. Then tell your stakeholders that using the framework will provide immediate benefits.
  5. Work with stakeholders to make sure that your EA’s are involved in their processes without any clear idea of what the EA is supposed to do there. Just toss ’em in and let them float.
  6. Delete all the data from your tool. Give no one any reason why. You were just having a bad hair day.
  7. Get in front of the most senior people you can, and when you get there, tell them how badly they do strategic planning.
  8. Change your offerings every four months. Each time, only share the new set of architectural services with about 20% of your stakeholders.
  9. Create a conceptual model of the enterprise that uses terms that no one in the enterprise uses. Refer to well known business thinkers as sources. When people complain, tell them that they are wrong. Never allow aliases.
  10. Every time you touch an IT project, slow it down. Occasionally throw a fit and stop an IT project just for fun. Escalate as high as you can every time. Win your battles at all costs.

Your career will be short. 🙂

Unraveling the Developer Bias in Agile Development Practices

By |2016-09-28T22:44:07+00:00April 16th, 2013|Enterprise Architecture|

There is a contradiction that shows up in many books and articles on agile software development.  .  And I’m going to rant a little on one of them: the “developer” bias in Agile software practices.

Before I begin my rant, I’d like to tell you where it comes from.  I am an Enterprise Architect.  I am also an agilest.  I am a certified Scrummaster (for many years) and have been on many agile projects.  I’ve seen success, and I’ve seen failure.  I know that agile is good, but not good enough to overcome people who are determined to undermine change.  (more…)

Rumination on the concept of “best practice”

By |2013-01-28T18:15:13+00:00January 28th, 2013|Enterprise Architecture|

I heard some very interesting talks today from Len Fehskens and Jeff Scott at the Open Group conference.  One thing that I picked up in a meeting yesterday was the notion that TOGAF 9.1 is built on “best practices.”  Today, as Jeff spoke about the transformation of a technical architect into a business architect, and as Len spoke about the challenges of communicating complex ideas, the notion of a “best practice” kept bothering me, and I cross-pollinated my concerns with the concepts that they were sharing.

I agree that the intent of the people who shared their practices with the Open Group was to provide practices that can be taught and followed.  I even agree that the people on the TOGAF committees that accepted the content felt that the practices represented the best that the industry had to offer at the time.  But I wonder if any of the work done in framework committees of any stripe (not to pick on the Open Group) can be held to the standard of being a “best practice.”

Are the practices in the TOGAF framework truly “best” practices?  Are these practices the best ones that the EA field has to offer? 

I guess I would have to follow the EA rabbit hole and ask “what criteria do we use to judge if a practice is the best one?”

After all, when Jeff Scott talks about business architecture using capability modeling, he believes that the practice of capability modeling is the best one to use for the results he is trying to achieve.  (I nearly always agree with Jeff, BTW.  We sometimes differ in language, but nearly never in approach).  That said, as much as Jeff and I agree, our agreement does not mean that the practice should be considered a “best” practice.  Who are we to say?  We are practitioners.  While that is good, it is not enough in my mind to qualify the practice as “best.”

To be a best practice, in my opinion, a method or approach has to meet a higher bar.  There has to be evidence that it is, in fact, better than just a “good practice.” 

I think a best practice should have:

  • Some measurement (evidence) that demonstrates that it is an effective practice, and that the measurement shows that it is at least as effective as other practices,
  • A clear understanding of the results of the practice and the context in which it is to be performed (think “Pattern Language” criteria),
  • Some analysis to show that it meets other criteria like broad applicability and simplicity, and
  • We should demonstrate the ability for that practice to be understood and performed by people who are currently in the role (e.g. can we teach it, and if we teach it, can others do it?).

 

I wonder if we went through most of our frameworks and highlighted the text that is able to meet a higher bar, like the one I describe, how much of the text would we cover?  2%?  10%? 

Is 10% coverage enough to say that a framework is based on best practices?