My favorite posession in high school was my drafting board.  Yep… I was geek, even then.  I was going to be the next Frank Lloyd Wright (or at least, I wanted to die trying).  I fell in love with Architecture in a high-school drafting class and was hooked.  I had notebook after notebook filled with sketches of floor plans and perspective drawings.  The year was 1979.  Good times.

So when I was talking to a fellow architect recently about one of our team meetings, I realized that I had a good thing back then, something that I don’t have today in my current incarnation of ‘Architect.’  When I created a set of blueprints for a house, it was accurate.  I was a careful person because I had to be. 

You see, the goal of a blueprint is that I can give a package of drawings to a builder and literally walk away.  The house that he or she builds should (if I did my job well) come out looking A LOT like the picture on the paper.  Not identical, mind you.  There will be minor gaps, and the builder may have to make a compromise or two, but for the most part, I should be able to walk through the finished house and find everything pretty much where I put it on paper.

If the builder had a question about the amount of carpet to order for a room, for instance, they could whip out a ruler and measure the size of the room on the blueprint.  If the scale was 1/2″, and the room, on paper, measured out to 6 inches wide, the builder KNEW he could order 12 feet of carpet.  (Of course, he would order 13 feet… just in case).

Point is that the diagram was so accurate that the builder would not have to ask me for anything that he could get by whipping out a ruler and measuring the drawing on the paper.

Why don’t we have this kind of accuracy in our architectural models? 

Is that something we should strive for?  This is not an MDA question.  This is an accuracy question. 

In your opinion, gentle reader, what level of accuracy should the architectural model go to?